Why Was Venus Williams Raw Vegan Diet Unsustainable?

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You may have recently come across this article on Insider.com

https://www.insider.com/venus-williams-raw-vegan-diet-what-she-eats-now-2019-10

The article states that Venus Williams, a former Tennis Grand Slam champion, no longer follows her strict raw vegan diet.

Venus said:

“That way of eating was just hard to maintain for long periods of time,” Williams told Insider. “Sometimes you just need something more substantial — some rice, some potatoes — after a workout.” Lentils are also one of her favorite post-training meals, she said. 

So why did Venus go raw vegan in the first place?

It turns out that she was having problems with an automimmune condition known as Sjogrens syndrome. Sjögren’s syndrome, is an autoimmune disorder that can cause extreme fatigue, joint pain, and digestive issues.

It certainly makes sense for Venus to have followed a raw vegan diet in this situation. It does appear that Sjogren sydrome responds well to dietary change.

What was the issue she experienced with the raw vegan diet that made her add in more cooked food?

Was it some kind of deficiency of nutrients lacking in fruits and vegetables? Was it a lack of good fruit where she lived? Was it the cold weather?

No, as she clearly states, she was looking for something “more substantial”, in other words she was looking to feel fuller and more satiated with her meals.

The article says many positive things about the raw vegan diet. That it is a healthier option due to eliminating a number of disease promoting foods and that it is an anti inflammatory diet. But it claims that the problem is that we can struggle to get enough calories on a raw vegan diet (inevitably this can lead to not feeling full, as Venus experienced). The article says:

Williams’ choice to add cooked foods into her still-vegan diet makes dietary and athletic sense. For one, it can be difficult to get enough calories on a raw vegan diet, especially if you’re an athlete.

Does It Make Sense For Athletes To Go Back To Cooked Food?

But does this really make sense? Is it simply not possible to eat enough calories on a raw vegan diet?

This is clearly not the case, as many ultra athletes have been able to train and gain enough calories on a raw vegan diet. Famous cases of this include Michael Arnstein, who labels himself as The Fruitarian and has won some of the most gruelling Ultra marathon races in the world. Harriet Kjaer from Denmark has competed in 350km races as a raw vegan and became Denmark’s top ultra runner on a 100% raw vegan lifestyle.

The TRUTH: What Was Venus Williams Really Eating?

To look into this further firstly, we must work out what Venus Williams was ACTUALLY eating. Unfortunately, it is hard to figure out exactly what kind of raw vegan diet she was eating.

One article, seems to suggest that Venus was not on a raw vegan diet:

https://www.health.com/nutrition/venus-williams-raw-vegan-diet

In it, Venus states:

” One of my favorite recipes is celery-root soup. I get celery root, tomato, and some Silk almond milk as a base to thicken it a little bit, and then maybe I’ll add pan-fried garlic on top, maybe some truffle oil—whatever I have at the time, I’ll throw it in. It makes for some interesting dishes”

The article comes from an event promoting “Silk” soya milk. This article would suggest that Venus was eating a plant based diet with more raw foods rather than a strictly raw vegan diet.

Looking further into this, is it unclear as to whether Venus was even vegan at all:

“While the superstar sisters technically consider themselves ‘chegan’—because they occasionally indulge in cooked fish or chicken if they feel the need/want to celebrate—their foundational diet for health and training is both raw and vegan. “

Taken from https://www.ecowatch.com/venus-and-serena-williams-raw-vegan-powerhouses-1882106143.html

This article for example ( https://www.self.com/story/this-is-what-venus-williams-really-eats-in-a-day ) talks about what Venus eats in a day. It includes chicken breast salad. Another article mentions her eating egg white omelettes.

The conclusion from this is that it is not clear what type of raw vegan diet Venus ate or whether she was ever truly raw or vegan at all. It would seem that this is another article throwing negative light on a the raw vegan diet, when it seems clear that the person in question did not even follow this diet.

Big Mistake: Blaming The Diet Instead Of Looking At What The Person Is Actually Eating

This is a big mistake even experienced raw vegan educators make. When someone comes to them saying they are experiencing challenges on a raw vegan diet, they can be too quick to look into potential deficiencies and other issues that are very unlikely to be the real reason that the person is experiencing challenges on a raw vegan diet.

Usually, we just have to look further into what the person is actually eating to realise either that they are not eating a raw vegan diet, or that the diet they are eating is not a sufficient raw vegan diet.

However, if Venus did go raw vegan and felt it was not substantial enough it is most likely the case that she made one of the biggest errors that many people make when they try to eat a raw vegan diet.

The Most Likely Mistake Made

It is likely that she simply did not eat enough calories. This can particularly be the case if someone focuses on green juices and salads and forget that in order to get the carbohydrates we require for optimal performance we must make fruit the focus of our raw vegan diet.

Our suggestion to Venus and to all athletes would be:

The next time you go raw, make sure to eat enough fruit to fuel you adequately for success!

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Raw vs Cooked With Dr Doug Graham

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What is the difference between raw food and cooked food?

More and more, the plant based vegan diet is starting to gain acceptance across the globe. Doctors, nutritionists, athletes and scientists galore and starting to embrace the benefits of a diet that is void of animal products.

High budget films with celebrities and influential figures are sharing this message in a powerful way and the world is starting to wake up to the incredible benefits a person can experience when we get rid of animal products from our diet.

But are we missing something important?

There are many people that still experience health issues when they switch to a vegan diet. Over the last few years a number of high profile vegans have returned to experimenting with animal products. Though many of these people may just be making excuses for wanting to go back to a more common diet, some may have struggled to be comfortable with a cooked vegan diet.

We must always go back to the fundamentals of human anatomy and human nutrition. The healthiest foods, and the most important foods for our health are fruits and vegetables. Of those, fruits are vastly under eaten to the extent that it is estimated that millions of extra people are in hospital each year due to not eating enough fruit to support their health.

For those on a raw diet, there is a big difference between cooked food and raw food. Cooked food is dry, dehydrating, harder to digest and ultimately unsatisfying. We often add stimulants such as salt to cooked food to add the flavour that they lack.

But the most obvious difference to a raw fooder is that cooked foods are tremendously addictive. It is hard to limit cooked food on a raw diet, driving many over the years to commit to 100% raw, where they feel they have more control over their food choices and better and more consistent results in their health.

Others choose to remain eating cooked food as they find it too hard to give up. For many, going raw long term is one of the hardest challenges they ever faced.

In the video above, Dr Doug Graham talks about some of the other issues connected to eating cooked food.

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How To Know You Are Eating ENOUGH On A Raw Vegan Diet

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How To Know You Are Eating ENOUGH On A Raw Vegan Diet

 

One of the most controversial questions in the raw vegan world is “how much should we eat on a raw vegan diet”?

There are a number of differing opinions on this topic so it can be very confusing for a beginner.

You may also wonder whether you can simply follow your body’s own hunger cues. Unfortunately, this can be confusing on a raw diet as the body responds differently to a raw diet than to a cooked diet.

In this message I hope to go over some of the issues surrounding this question and give, hopefully, some very common sense guidance.

First off, we can perhaps throw out some ideas. For example some people claim that we should eat a particular weight of food. So they recommend you eat 2 pounds of food per day as long as it is raw.

This is too vague an answer. Different foods vary a lot in terms of the level of nutrition and calories so it just doesn’t make sense to use weight as a reliable measurement. 2 pounds of nuts is a lot different to 2 pounds of lettuce.

The most reliable way to know if you are eating enough is to track your weight. If you are losing weight (and this is not your intention) then you know you need to eat more. If you are gaining weight (and it is not your intention) then it is a good indication you are eating too much.

But exactly what are we eating too much of?

The most accurate way to measure the value of food in terms of the energy that it provides us is to measure the calories in a food. Some people may suggest that this is different when it comes to a raw food diet but there is little reason for anyone to believe it is different. There is some debate as to how accurate this process is, but it is the most accurate method we have.

If we can work out how many calories we need to maintain our weight and stay healthy then we could work out how much food we require and translate this to what is available to us on a raw vegan diet.

A method for determining how many calories we require comes from Dr Doug Graham’s book, the 80/10/10 Diet.

He states that we first work out our Basal Metabolic Rate. This is the energy we use if we were just to sit in bed and do nothing all day. In the case of a 150 pound person, their BMR would be 1500 calories. We figure this out simply by multiplying the weight of the individual in pounds by 10.

Once we have done this we must add on how many calories we use up in our day to day activities and exercise.

To get a more accurate reading you can use the Harris- Benedict equation for working out BMR and then multiplying this by an activity factor.

The average for a woman is around 1800 calories and for a man is around 2500 (per day).

If we translate that to raw food we have a few options. We can certainly make up these calories easily by eating nuts,seeds or oils as these substances are very dense in calories (mostly from fat).

However, to maintain a raw vegan diet long term it is important to feel good. When we eat a high proportion of our calories as fat we reduce our body’s ability to supply nutrients such as oxygen and sugar to the blood cells as efficiently as possible.

The ideal ratio of macronutrients in our diet is signified by the 80/10/10 proportion. At least 80% of our calories should therefore come from carbohydrates.

This matches the ratio that is inherent in most fruits. This is one of the many reasons that basing our raw food diet on fruit rather than fat is a better option.

Therefore, we simply now have to look at how many calories we require on a daily basis and aim to get most of those from fruit with a smaller percentage gained from vegetables, nuts and seeds.

For example, a woman requiring 1800 calories per day could make up her diet with 18 bananas. This would roughly be what she would require.

If she preferred more variety she could have 8 bananas (800 calories) , 6 large mangoes (approx 800 calories) and a large salad with some avocado (approximately 200 calories).

Someone looking at these quantities of food may start to think that this is “too much”. They are reacting to the volume of the food. With raw food we must eat a greater volume of food to get the same calories as we did from cooked food.

If we do not, then we will struggle to maintain our weight and struggle to avoid the temptations of other foods. When you are satisfied from eating enough fruit you are much less likely to be tempted by less healthy foods.

BEWARE: Not eating ENOUGH is by far the biggest reason people struggle to feel good on this lifestyle long term or remain successful on it.  It is also the reason we hear about “emaciated” raw vegans.  Almost all of the time, people were simply not eating enough.

In conclusion:

1. Calories: Work out your daily calorie needs. 

2.  Fruits: Become familiar with the amount of calories in all of the common fruits and other raw foods that you eat.

3. Eat Enough fruit to satisfy the majority of your calorie needs and make up the rest with vegetables, salads and nuts and seeds (at first this will seem like A LOT of food.  You will get used to this over time and enjoy the real feeling of satisfaction that comes with this)

4.Track Your Weight to see if you are eating too little or too much.

That’s about it.

You may wonder why you need to put this work in. Surely, if this is a more “natural diet” then our body should tell us all we need to know?

The problem with this is we simply don’t live in our natural environment and we were not brought up on our best diet. We have not learned from experience how much we need to eat to feel good.

I hope this works out for you, you can get back to me if you have some thoughts of your own.

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The Love Fruit Podcast Episode #5 – The Raw Viking- Robert Rehnmark

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In this episode of the Love Fruit podcast we are joined by the Raw Viking, Rob Rehmark.

Rob has been on a vegan and raw vegan diet for many years and made his transition through following his own path. He has attended many fruit festivals around the world and inspired others with his videos on his Raw Viking page.

He now intends on moving to Ecuador to build his own fruitful paradise. I think you will enjoy this episode and Rob’s ideas a lot.

Find more about Rob here:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-fpi1fdycaj8SVJ7Zg6i_A

And hear more episodes of the Love Fruit Podcast here:

Podcast

You can also find us on Spotify, Stitcher and other podcast networks.

 

 

 

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Jesse Bogdanovich’s Amazing Raw Food Healing Journey

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Jesse Bogdanovich came to UK Fruitfest in 2016. He shared with us his story of healing on a raw food diet.

He made a truly amazing recovery and we are so glad he was at the festival to share his story with us.

The raw vegan diet has the power to change your life. Some people recover their health, some people find new purpose in life, others fall in love with nature or fitness.

It is a truly epic adventure. Once you are on the path you will never look back!

#fruitarian #rawvegan #rawfood #ukfruitfest #fruitfest

UK Fruitfest takes place from the 21st to the 28th of July 2019. The venue is Croft Farm Waterpark Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire. Book now: http://www.fruitfest.co.uk/registration

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The Golden Age And The Fall Of Mankind – Video With Tony Wright

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Tony Wright joined us in 2016. He is the author of the books “Left In The Dark” and “Return To The Brain Of Eden”

Tony is the unofficial world record holder for the most days and nights spent without sleep, which shows his dedication to try to unlock the secrets of the human brain.

Could the move away from our natural diet of fruit have done more than just impacted the health of our body? Could it have affected the evolution of our brain?

Has our brain devolved? Did we once have abilities and function that we only now get glimpses of?

Read his books to learn more.

 

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Health Is Like A Wagon Wheel – Professor Rozalind Graham (Video)

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Health Is Like A Wagon Wheel – Professor Rozalind Graham (Video)

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Keto Diet Or High Carb Diet For Controlling Diabetes – Robby Barbaro

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Staying Raw In The Winter Is Easy – With Melissa Raimondi

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Learn more from Melissa by following her on Youtube and Instagram.  Her account name is Raw Food Romance.

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RESPONSE to article “Eating Only Fruit Might Be Trendy, But It’s A Really Bad Idea”

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RESPONSE to article “Eating Only Fruit Might Be Trendy, But It’s A Really Bad Idea”

 

A recent article posted on refinery29.com has put together 3 major reasons as to why a Fruitarian diet is a bad idea.  You can read the whole article here:

https://www.refinery29.com/en-us/frutitarian-fruit-only-diet-dangers

Let’s have a look through the article to confront the issues it raises and see if we can offer any helpful commentary on this.

The first problem with the fruitarian diet is:

 

Reason 1: “You need other nutrients”

 

This section, though recognising the many benefits of fruit, makes the claim that “fruit can’t provide all of the vital nutrients your body needs to function.”

This is true.  But this is true of all foods and all variations of diet.  The reason for this is that there are nutrients that we require that are not provided by food.  Vitamin D comes from sunlight on our skin and vitamin B12 is created by bacteria.  Other essential nutrients are created by our body once we have consumed the building blocks from food.

Therefore it is truthful to say that fruit doesn’t provide all of our required nutrients….but this is not giving the whole story.  The author then goes on to say:

“For example, you need foods with protein to transport, build, and repair tissue, and fat to protect your organs and help your brain do its job.”

This comment implies that fruit does not contain protein.  Although this is technically true, protein is not a required nutrient either as the body synthesises protein from amino acids.  All whole foods, including fruit contain amino acids.  The real question is whether there is enough amino acids in fruits to fuel our repair and growth?

Fruit contains roughly the same proportion of protein as does mother’s milk.  Mother’s milk is the food we consume when we do the most growth in our life, doubling our body size in a short space of time.  If nature has provided us with adequate protein in milk, then the amount of protein in fruit should also be adequate.

This is hard to disprove as cases of protein deficiency have never been found.  Conditions which are confused with protein deficiency such as kwashiorkor only occur in situations in which there is inadequate total calorie intake.  In other words, the person is actually consuming their own protein (and turning it into calories) due to a lack of food rather than because of a lack of protein.

No study has proven that a fruitarian diet is inadequate for protein in humans.  Our best way to evaluate this would be to look at other similar animals that consume a fruitarian style diet.  What we find is that these animals do not suffer from protein deficiencies despite their diet’s being almost entirely made up of fruit.

 

Reason 2: It’s restrictive.

 

In this section the author talks about the issue of restrictive eating.  Restricting what we eat is difficult to do long term and can lead to harming our relationship with food.

Although there could be some truth to these things the consequences of not restricting our diet in some ways are very severe.  We now know that people are much more at risk from eating to excess than eating restrictively.  The number of people suffering from problems related to unrestricted eating is far greater than those suffering from restrictive eating disorders.

Therefore, it makes sense that we should to some degree restrict our diets.  The alternative is to eat the standard diet that we know for sure contributes to the major diseases like heart disease, cancer and diabetes.

Though a fruitarian diet is difficult, it is made more difficult by the fact that we condition people to eat a poor diet from birth.  If people were brought up in a different environment with a different diet, then no one would have an issue sticking to that diet as it would be second nature to them.

The issue to stick to is whether a fruitarian style diet is healthier.  Though there is little research on people trying fruitarian diets in the long term this is something that will hopefully be studied more in the future.  For now we can look once again to animals that share our biology, who all seem to thrive on a fruit based diet.

Also, is eating fruit truly restrictive?

How many varieties of food does the average person consume per week?  Grains and grain based products, types of meat, dairy based products…it’s not a huge variety?  A fruit lover can eat hundreds of completely different types of fruit each year. As the seasons change, entirely new fruits appear for us to enjoy.

 

Reason 3: It could be pretty bad for you.

 

In order to back up this claim, the author has relied on an anecdotal story of Ashton Kutcher’s attempt at eating an all fruit diet to prepare for his role as Steve Jobs:

“he attempted to eat Jobs’ infamous all-fruit diet to get into character, and ended up in the hospital due to low pancreas levels.”

There is no explanation here as to what “low pancreas levels” means.  When someone goes to hospital, is it usual for doctors to test for “pancreas levels”?  Perhaps they are referring to insulin levels but we do not really know.

This is a pretty poor source to quote from.  Once again, there are no studies showing a connection between fruit and an impairment to the function of the pancreas.  There are none showing a connection between fruit and pancreatic cancer (which Steve Jobs died from).

What is also unusual is that Kutcher’s former partner, Demi Moore, has been famously said to be essentially a raw vegan:

https://www.celebrityhealthfitness.com/27289/demi-moore-wows-at-51-anti-aging-fitness-secrets-are-raw-vegan-diet-and-yoga-workouts/

She is known to have worked with Dr Doug Graham, author of the 80/10/10 Diet and one of the main people responsible for the rise in popularity of a fruit based diet.  It is unusual that he would not have turned to her for some advice on how to try this diet out.

“Additionally, for people with diabetes who can’t create or utilize insulin, an all-fruit diet could be harmful, according to the Cleveland Clinic.”

Any diet is harmful for a diabetic if they are not taking insulin.  Therefore once again, this statement is a half truth.  But is a fruit diet going to be more harmful for a diabetic. 

What has often been found, though not yet fully studied, is that people on a fruit based diet actually require less insulin if they are diabetic.  A great example of this is Robby Barbaro from “Mastering Diabetes”.  Robby has been on a fruitarian style diet for over 10 years and has had no problems with controlling his diabetes on this lifestyle.

 

Conclusion

 

“So, if you’re still intrigued by what an all-fruit diet entails, ask your doctor — chances are they’ll tell you to stick to “an apple a day,” and a variety of other foods as well.”

Of course this is really what everyone wants to hear.  Just keep eating whatever you are eating…move along, nothing to see here.

Doctor’s are not qualified to give nutrition or dietary advice.  The diet advice out there in the world of healthcare is pretty poor and often not in line with the latest science on nutrition.

Much of it has been influenced over many years by the agenda and lobbying power of various food industries.  This information has led to mass confusion in the public consciousness about diet.

We would encourage you to give a fruit based diet a try.  Don’t jump in over night but set it as your destination and start to move towards it by making gradual changes.  Many people start with fruit for breakfast, then they continue from there.

You may be amazed by the health improvements it brings as well as the change to your body, mind and spirit.  If you want to learn more about this kind of lifestyle consider coming to UK Fruitfest taking place from the 21st to the 28th of July, 2019.

 

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