How Much Fat Should We Eat On A Raw Vegan Diet?

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How much fat should you eat on a raw vegan diet?

You might be perplexed by this question.

Surely, you may say, as long as it is RAW then it is HEALTHY!

Or you may think to yourself “as long as I eat raw, my body will be able to tell me how much to eat”

Alternatively, you may be thinking “surely, we must make sure we eat an abundance of healthy fats”

Unfortunately, a healthy raw diet is not as simple as “as long as it is raw it is healthy”

Especially as many foods are labeled “raw” but in reality they have been dried, processed or dehydrated in some way which has changed the nature of the food completely.

Have you ever eaten truly RAW nuts? They are not as moreish and hard to put down as those in a bag.

Let’s get back to diets in general.

When we look for clues as to how we should design our diet we could do much worse than looking at the diets of the “blue zones”. These are the areas in the world that are renowned for producing the highest proportion of centenarians (people who live to age 100 and older) and healthy older people per capita.

The researchers have looked at the similarities between these populations and have found a few things in common. When it comes to diet they all consume a mostly plant-based diet.

And what was also remarkable was that carbohydrates made up the vast majority of the diet, 70% and upwards for each population with no exceptions.

When we look into the science of nutrition and of sports performance we find that carbohydrates are the body’s preferred source for fuel. Top athletes maintain a high carbohydrate diet when they wish to perform at there highest level.

But perhaps this equation is different for a raw diet?

The work of Dr Douglas Graham would suggest not. With over 35 years of experience working with people who were eating raw diets he often found that people were consuming as much as 60% or more of their diet from fat.

Often this was in the form of processed fat like oils, nut butters, seed spreads and tahini…which quickly add up to a LOT of calories as FAT is more than double the calories of carbohydrate sources.

Do we have long term studies on a high fat raw diet versus a low fat raw diet? Sadly not.

We have to assume the same rules apply regardless of whether the diet is raw or not. We should head towards a diet made primarily of fruit to make sure we will feel and perform our best on a raw diet.

Fruit provides us with the perfect balance of carbohydrates, proteins and fats that help us to feel and perform our best.  But if we do not eat enough fruit to satisfy our caloric need we will inevitable start being hungry for almost anything else.

At that point, our cravings for fatty foods will become much more intense.  But when we eat these foods we are left with a heavy feeling in our stomach and still no real sense of satisfaction

Fruit is truly where it is at for performance and health!

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How To Know You Are Eating ENOUGH On A Raw Vegan Diet

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How To Know You Are Eating ENOUGH On A Raw Vegan Diet

 

One of the most controversial questions in the raw vegan world is “how much should we eat on a raw vegan diet”?

There are a number of differing opinions on this topic so it can be very confusing for a beginner.

You may also wonder whether you can simply follow your body’s own hunger cues. Unfortunately, this can be confusing on a raw diet as the body responds differently to a raw diet than to a cooked diet.

In this message I hope to go over some of the issues surrounding this question and give, hopefully, some very common sense guidance.

First off, we can perhaps throw out some ideas. For example some people claim that we should eat a particular weight of food. So they recommend you eat 2 pounds of food per day as long as it is raw.

This is too vague an answer. Different foods vary a lot in terms of the level of nutrition and calories so it just doesn’t make sense to use weight as a reliable measurement. 2 pounds of nuts is a lot different to 2 pounds of lettuce.

The most reliable way to know if you are eating enough is to track your weight. If you are losing weight (and this is not your intention) then you know you need to eat more. If you are gaining weight (and it is not your intention) then it is a good indication you are eating too much.

But exactly what are we eating too much of?

The most accurate way to measure the value of food in terms of the energy that it provides us is to measure the calories in a food. Some people may suggest that this is different when it comes to a raw food diet but there is little reason for anyone to believe it is different. There is some debate as to how accurate this process is, but it is the most accurate method we have.

If we can work out how many calories we need to maintain our weight and stay healthy then we could work out how much food we require and translate this to what is available to us on a raw vegan diet.

A method for determining how many calories we require comes from Dr Doug Graham’s book, the 80/10/10 Diet.

He states that we first work out our Basal Metabolic Rate. This is the energy we use if we were just to sit in bed and do nothing all day. In the case of a 150 pound person, their BMR would be 1500 calories. We figure this out simply by multiplying the weight of the individual in pounds by 10.

Once we have done this we must add on how many calories we use up in our day to day activities and exercise.

To get a more accurate reading you can use the Harris- Benedict equation for working out BMR and then multiplying this by an activity factor.

The average for a woman is around 1800 calories and for a man is around 2500 (per day).

If we translate that to raw food we have a few options. We can certainly make up these calories easily by eating nuts,seeds or oils as these substances are very dense in calories (mostly from fat).

However, to maintain a raw vegan diet long term it is important to feel good. When we eat a high proportion of our calories as fat we reduce our body’s ability to supply nutrients such as oxygen and sugar to the blood cells as efficiently as possible.

The ideal ratio of macronutrients in our diet is signified by the 80/10/10 proportion. At least 80% of our calories should therefore come from carbohydrates.

This matches the ratio that is inherent in most fruits. This is one of the many reasons that basing our raw food diet on fruit rather than fat is a better option.

Therefore, we simply now have to look at how many calories we require on a daily basis and aim to get most of those from fruit with a smaller percentage gained from vegetables, nuts and seeds.

For example, a woman requiring 1800 calories per day could make up her diet with 18 bananas. This would roughly be what she would require.

If she preferred more variety she could have 8 bananas (800 calories) , 6 large mangoes (approx 800 calories) and a large salad with some avocado (approximately 200 calories).

Someone looking at these quantities of food may start to think that this is “too much”. They are reacting to the volume of the food. With raw food we must eat a greater volume of food to get the same calories as we did from cooked food.

If we do not, then we will struggle to maintain our weight and struggle to avoid the temptations of other foods. When you are satisfied from eating enough fruit you are much less likely to be tempted by less healthy foods.

BEWARE: Not eating ENOUGH is by far the biggest reason people struggle to feel good on this lifestyle long term or remain successful on it.  It is also the reason we hear about “emaciated” raw vegans.  Almost all of the time, people were simply not eating enough.

In conclusion:

1. Calories: Work out your daily calorie needs. 

2.  Fruits: Become familiar with the amount of calories in all of the common fruits and other raw foods that you eat.

3. Eat Enough fruit to satisfy the majority of your calorie needs and make up the rest with vegetables, salads and nuts and seeds (at first this will seem like A LOT of food.  You will get used to this over time and enjoy the real feeling of satisfaction that comes with this)

4.Track Your Weight to see if you are eating too little or too much.

That’s about it.

You may wonder why you need to put this work in. Surely, if this is a more “natural diet” then our body should tell us all we need to know?

The problem with this is we simply don’t live in our natural environment and we were not brought up on our best diet. We have not learned from experience how much we need to eat to feel good.

I hope this works out for you, you can get back to me if you have some thoughts of your own.

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Spoil Your Appetite With Fruit – Video With Dr Doug Graham

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Have you ever wondered why desert has to be served after a big meal?

Why is our desire for food not completely satisfied by our meal?

Dr Doug Graham speaks about this concept in this video.

Generally, people do not eat enough volume or enough simple carbohydrate to truly spoil their appetite…leaving them snacking all day long or eating sweets after every meal.

This is because we are designed for consuming fruit. A larger volume of food and a food full of instant fuel from the sugars that are in fruit.

To truly feel a sense of satisfaction, learn to eat enough fruit!

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RESPONSE to article “Eating Only Fruit Might Be Trendy, But It’s A Really Bad Idea”

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RESPONSE to article “Eating Only Fruit Might Be Trendy, But It’s A Really Bad Idea”

 

A recent article posted on refinery29.com has put together 3 major reasons as to why a Fruitarian diet is a bad idea.  You can read the whole article here:

https://www.refinery29.com/en-us/frutitarian-fruit-only-diet-dangers

Let’s have a look through the article to confront the issues it raises and see if we can offer any helpful commentary on this.

The first problem with the fruitarian diet is:

 

Reason 1: “You need other nutrients”

 

This section, though recognising the many benefits of fruit, makes the claim that “fruit can’t provide all of the vital nutrients your body needs to function.”

This is true.  But this is true of all foods and all variations of diet.  The reason for this is that there are nutrients that we require that are not provided by food.  Vitamin D comes from sunlight on our skin and vitamin B12 is created by bacteria.  Other essential nutrients are created by our body once we have consumed the building blocks from food.

Therefore it is truthful to say that fruit doesn’t provide all of our required nutrients….but this is not giving the whole story.  The author then goes on to say:

“For example, you need foods with protein to transport, build, and repair tissue, and fat to protect your organs and help your brain do its job.”

This comment implies that fruit does not contain protein.  Although this is technically true, protein is not a required nutrient either as the body synthesises protein from amino acids.  All whole foods, including fruit contain amino acids.  The real question is whether there is enough amino acids in fruits to fuel our repair and growth?

Fruit contains roughly the same proportion of protein as does mother’s milk.  Mother’s milk is the food we consume when we do the most growth in our life, doubling our body size in a short space of time.  If nature has provided us with adequate protein in milk, then the amount of protein in fruit should also be adequate.

This is hard to disprove as cases of protein deficiency have never been found.  Conditions which are confused with protein deficiency such as kwashiorkor only occur in situations in which there is inadequate total calorie intake.  In other words, the person is actually consuming their own protein (and turning it into calories) due to a lack of food rather than because of a lack of protein.

No study has proven that a fruitarian diet is inadequate for protein in humans.  Our best way to evaluate this would be to look at other similar animals that consume a fruitarian style diet.  What we find is that these animals do not suffer from protein deficiencies despite their diet’s being almost entirely made up of fruit.

 

Reason 2: It’s restrictive.

 

In this section the author talks about the issue of restrictive eating.  Restricting what we eat is difficult to do long term and can lead to harming our relationship with food.

Although there could be some truth to these things the consequences of not restricting our diet in some ways are very severe.  We now know that people are much more at risk from eating to excess than eating restrictively.  The number of people suffering from problems related to unrestricted eating is far greater than those suffering from restrictive eating disorders.

Therefore, it makes sense that we should to some degree restrict our diets.  The alternative is to eat the standard diet that we know for sure contributes to the major diseases like heart disease, cancer and diabetes.

Though a fruitarian diet is difficult, it is made more difficult by the fact that we condition people to eat a poor diet from birth.  If people were brought up in a different environment with a different diet, then no one would have an issue sticking to that diet as it would be second nature to them.

The issue to stick to is whether a fruitarian style diet is healthier.  Though there is little research on people trying fruitarian diets in the long term this is something that will hopefully be studied more in the future.  For now we can look once again to animals that share our biology, who all seem to thrive on a fruit based diet.

Also, is eating fruit truly restrictive?

How many varieties of food does the average person consume per week?  Grains and grain based products, types of meat, dairy based products…it’s not a huge variety?  A fruit lover can eat hundreds of completely different types of fruit each year. As the seasons change, entirely new fruits appear for us to enjoy.

 

Reason 3: It could be pretty bad for you.

 

In order to back up this claim, the author has relied on an anecdotal story of Ashton Kutcher’s attempt at eating an all fruit diet to prepare for his role as Steve Jobs:

“he attempted to eat Jobs’ infamous all-fruit diet to get into character, and ended up in the hospital due to low pancreas levels.”

There is no explanation here as to what “low pancreas levels” means.  When someone goes to hospital, is it usual for doctors to test for “pancreas levels”?  Perhaps they are referring to insulin levels but we do not really know.

This is a pretty poor source to quote from.  Once again, there are no studies showing a connection between fruit and an impairment to the function of the pancreas.  There are none showing a connection between fruit and pancreatic cancer (which Steve Jobs died from).

What is also unusual is that Kutcher’s former partner, Demi Moore, has been famously said to be essentially a raw vegan:

https://www.celebrityhealthfitness.com/27289/demi-moore-wows-at-51-anti-aging-fitness-secrets-are-raw-vegan-diet-and-yoga-workouts/

She is known to have worked with Dr Doug Graham, author of the 80/10/10 Diet and one of the main people responsible for the rise in popularity of a fruit based diet.  It is unusual that he would not have turned to her for some advice on how to try this diet out.

“Additionally, for people with diabetes who can’t create or utilize insulin, an all-fruit diet could be harmful, according to the Cleveland Clinic.”

Any diet is harmful for a diabetic if they are not taking insulin.  Therefore once again, this statement is a half truth.  But is a fruit diet going to be more harmful for a diabetic. 

What has often been found, though not yet fully studied, is that people on a fruit based diet actually require less insulin if they are diabetic.  A great example of this is Robby Barbaro from “Mastering Diabetes”.  Robby has been on a fruitarian style diet for over 10 years and has had no problems with controlling his diabetes on this lifestyle.

 

Conclusion

 

“So, if you’re still intrigued by what an all-fruit diet entails, ask your doctor — chances are they’ll tell you to stick to “an apple a day,” and a variety of other foods as well.”

Of course this is really what everyone wants to hear.  Just keep eating whatever you are eating…move along, nothing to see here.

Doctor’s are not qualified to give nutrition or dietary advice.  The diet advice out there in the world of healthcare is pretty poor and often not in line with the latest science on nutrition.

Much of it has been influenced over many years by the agenda and lobbying power of various food industries.  This information has led to mass confusion in the public consciousness about diet.

We would encourage you to give a fruit based diet a try.  Don’t jump in over night but set it as your destination and start to move towards it by making gradual changes.  Many people start with fruit for breakfast, then they continue from there.

You may be amazed by the health improvements it brings as well as the change to your body, mind and spirit.  If you want to learn more about this kind of lifestyle consider coming to UK Fruitfest taking place from the 21st to the 28th of July, 2019.

 

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What’s Wrong With The Wikipedia Page on “Fruitarianism”

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What’s Wrong With The Wikipedia Page on “Fruitarianism”

by Ronnie Smith
 
Many people who are researching Fruitarianism or Raw Veganism for the first time may end up reading Wikipedia.  Wikipedia is an online dictionary which is made up by contributions mostly from volunteers.  I am not sure exactly how this is policed, but obviously the system has some flaws.
 
I have tried to edit the page on “Fruitarianism” in the past, but it seems to always have been edited back again.  For this post, I will go through the page and point on what I see as being wrong with it.  I will post the Wikipedia information in BOLD and my comments in ITALICS.

 

Here we go:

 

Fruitarianism (/frˈtɛəriənɪzəm/) is a diet that consists entirely or primarily of fruits in the botanical sense, and possibly nuts and seeds, but without animal products. Fruitarianism is a subset of dietary veganism.

 

Mostly so far this is accurate, though some would suggest that nuts are not a part of a fruitarian diet.

 

Fruitarianism may be adopted for different reasons, including ethicalreligiousenvironmental, cultural, economic, and health. There are several varieties of the diet. Some people with a diet consisting of 75% or more fruit consider themselves fruitarians.[1]

 

I haven’t met anyone who became a fruitarian for religious, cultural, environmental or economic reasons.  It tends to be a choice made for ethical or health reasons primarily.

I had no idea where the 75% figure came from but apparently it was a survey by Tom Billings from a very old website called “Living and Raw Foods”…this doesn’t seem to be the best source.  

 

Definitions

 

Some fruitarians will eat only what falls (or would fall) naturally from a plant: that is, foods that can be harvested without killing or harming the plant.[2][3][4] 

These foods consist primarily of culinary fruits, nuts, and seeds.[5]According to author Adam Gollner, some fruitarians eat only fallen fruit.[6][page needed][unreliable source?] 

 

No fruitarian eats only fallen fruit.  This is an unusual myth that seems to have been spread by the book “Fruit Hunters”.  This practise would be impossible unless you had a very large personal orchard.

 

Some do not eat grains, believing it is unnatural to do so,[7] 

 

The reference for this link is not a fruitarian website as far as I can see and I am not sure why this is connected.  The point is probably true though.

 

and some fruitarians feel that it is improper for humans to eat seeds[8] as they contain future plants,[6][page needed] or nuts and seeds,[9] or any foods besides juicy fruits.[10] Others believe they should eat only plants that spread seeds when the plant is eaten.[11] Others eat seeds and some cooked foods.[12] 

 

I’m starting to realise quite a few sources come from Tom Billings, who runs a site called Beyond Vegetarianism and who is clearly anti Fruitarian: “The material on this site is predominantly (but not totally) critical of fruitarianism.”

There is no clear definition of Fruitarian that is completely agreed upon.  Most use the word casually to mean that they love to eat a lot of fruit and they may believe it to be the best and healthiest diet. 

Others believe that Fruitarian should mean a completely raw diet based on fruit and others believe it should mean a strictly fruit diet with a particular philosophy towards not harming plants being connected to it.  Until the community of Fruitarians grows larger it is unlikely to have a clear definition anytime soon.

 

Some fruitarians use the botanical definitions of fruits and consume pulses, such as beanspeas, or other legumes. Other fruitarians’ diets include raw fruits, dried fruits, nuts, honey and olive oil,[13] or fruits, nuts, beans and chocolate.[14]

 

These are all vague ideas taken from unreliable sources.  Few people would classify beans and legumes as being fruits.  Most fruitarians are vegan and would avoid honey.

 

Motivation

Some fruitarians wish, like Jains, to avoid killing anything, including plants,[12] and refer to ahimsa fruitarianism.[15] For some fruitarians, the motivation comes from a fixation on a utopian past, their hope being to return to a past that pre-dates an agrarian society to when humans were simply gatherers.[16] 

 

The first sentence I believe to be mostly true however there is no clear source for people talking about “ahimsa fruitarianism” and it is not something I have heard many people mention. 

The bit about the “utopian” past was written by a lady that attended the Woodstock Fruit Festival years ago then wrote a slightly negative article about it.  I think there is some truth in what she is saying, though we are mostly looking towards a better future.  Once again, this is showing that sources are not coming from experts or from research but the opinion of a journalist.

 

Another common motivation is the desire to eliminate perceived toxicity from within the body. For others, the appeal of a fruitarian diet comes from the challenge that the restrictive nature of this diet provides.[16]

 

Once again this comes from THIS ARTICLE.  Eliminating toxicity is definitely a desire among many fruitarians.  Some also may like the challenge but it is very unlikely that they perceive it as restrictive in any way.

 

Nutritional concerns

According to nutritionists, adults must be careful not to follow a fruit-only diet for too long.[17] A fruitarian diet is wholly unsuitable for children (including teens), and several children have died due to having fruitarian diets imposed on them.[18][17]

 

The first source for this was a report about a couple who’s baby died after they fed it a fruitarian diet.  This is the report here

In this case it is very unclear what the issue was.  Firstly, the baby died at 9 months old.  It is recommended that babies live purely on breast milk for the first 6 months of life, then solid food starts to be added to supplement the breast milk.  After 6 months, slowly, solid foods are introduced but breast milk is still the main source of nutrition.  This is from the NHS website:

“Your baby’s first foods can include mashed or soft cooked fruit and vegetables – such as parsnip, potato, yam, sweet potato, carrot, apple or pear – all cooled before eating.  Soft fruits, like peach or melon, or baby rice or baby cereal mixed with your baby’s usual milk are good as well”

Therefore, it would not be at all unusual for a baby to be on a diet mostly consisting of breast milk and fruit up to 9 months old.  The other foods in this example (yams etc) are not providing nutrition not already found in fruit.

It seems like the doctors warned that the mother’s breast milk was deficient.  Why was this the case?  Was it because of the mother’s fruitarian diet?  What exactly was it deficient in? We don’t know exactly, but I would suspect that the mother was perhaps not creating enough breast milk to fully satisfy the child.

Later the article suggests the child had a vitamin D deficiency, however it is not clear when this was determined or who by.

Later on the article quotes nutritionists saying that a fruitarian diet is unsuitable for a young child. Certainly for a child this young, they should be on breast milk almost entirely, so a fruitarian diet would not be recommended. But this one unclear scenario should not be used to discredit a fruitarian diet as we don’t know exactly what the parents did wrong.

The statement that several children have died after having fruitarian diets imposed on them is not backed up by a source.

The other source is a Columbia University website called Ask Alice that provides no sources for it’s assertions.

 

Nutritional deficiencies

 

Fruitarianism is even more restrictive than veganism or raw veganism.[19] Maintaining this diet over a long period can result in dangerous deficiencies, a risk that many fruitarians try to ward off through nutritional testing and vitamin injections.[16] The Health Promotion Program at Columbia University reports that a fruitarian diet can cause deficiencies in calciumproteinironzincvitamin D, most B vitamins (especially B12), and essential fatty acids.

 

These assertions are not based on studies of people on long term fruitarian diets and this is one of the weakest parts of the whole article.  This comes from the opinion of a Columbia University website but does not prove any of it’s statements with reference to any science.  

Personally, I have yet to see major deficiency problems exist among fruitarians and this is mostly scare mongering.  Until a proper study is done we can not determine whether these opinions are correct.

In reality, the best way for us to determine if this would likely be the case in humans would be to study other animals that have the same digestive and anantomical design as us.  We see these animals, such as Bonobos, thrive on a diet of of mostly fruit.  This would suggest that we would be perfectly capable of doing this as humans.

 

Although fruits provide a source of carbohydrates, they have very little protein, and because protein cannot be stored in the body as fat and carbohydrates can, fruitarians need to be careful that they consume enough protein each day.[20] When the body does not take in enough protein, it misses out on amino acids, which are essential to making body proteins which support the growth and maintenance of body tissues.[20] 

 

Very poor source for this.  An article about Steve Jobs in which a nutritionist has been asked for an opinion.  Our requirement for protein is very low and similar to that of other apes that subsist almost entirely on fruit.  The ratio of protein in fruit is similar to that in mother’s milk.  Eating enough calories each day will ensure enough protein.

 

Consuming high levels of fruit also poses a risk to those who are diabetic or pre-diabetic, due to the negative effect that the large amounts of sugar in fruits has on blood sugar levels.[21] 

 

A Fruitarian (raw vegan) I know that is a diabetic is Robby Barbaro from masteringdiabetes.com.  He is helping people to reverse diabetes through eating fruit. By the way, he has Type 1 Diabetes which developed for him in childhood.

A lot of information out there is telling diabetics to be careful with fruit.  In reality people should be moving away from the foods which cause diabetes, the high fat animal products that people are consuming to excess in the standard diet.

 

These high levels of sugar means that fruitarians are at high risk for tooth decay.[21] 

 

Many fruit eaters have experienced tooth decay but many have not.  It is unclear as to whether the fruit is the problem or a lack of personal hygiene sometimes displayed among fruitarians.  Many will give up using toothpaste or brushing teeth for a while and damage can set in without them realising leading to future problems.

Dried fruit can certainly be a big part of this problem as it is more likely to stick to the teeth which is a major contributor to tooth decay.  Modern dentistry allows us to live a comfortable life even if our teeth have become damaged.

 

Another concern that fruitarianism presents is that because fruit is easily digested, the body burns through meals quickly, and is hungry again soon after eating.[16] A side effect of the digestibility is that the body will defecate more frequently.[16] 

 

It is unusual to make an argument that the problem with fruit is that it is easy to digest.  This is actually a benefit. Why would we want to eat something hard to digest?

Many people suffering from constipation would see defecating more frequently as a benefit, not something to be feared.

Once again this is a very poor source.  The Guardian article written by a newcomer to the diet who did not know how to eat enough fruit to satisfy her self.  Most people feel very satisfied on a fruit diet.

 

Additionally, the Health Promotion Program at Columbia reports that food restrictions in general may lead to hunger, cravings, food obsessions, social disruptions, and social isolation.[18] The severe dietary restrictions inherent in a fruitarian regime also carries the serious risk of triggering orthorexia nervosa.[16]

 

Once again another poor source.  A Fruitarian diet is not based around restriction but embracing the abundance of fruit.  As for eating disorders, these seem to be triggered more by the standard diet than any other diet.

The source here is not making any reference to any particular study on this.  Giving up addictive foods will lead to cravings, but that is not a bad thing.  Food obsessions are displayed throughout all dietary types.

 

Vitamin B12[edit]

Vitamin B12, a bacterial product, cannot be obtained from fruits. According to the U.S. National Institutes of Health “natural food sources of vitamin B12 are limited to foods that come from animals.”[22] Like raw vegans who do not consume B12-fortified foods (certain plant milks and breakfast cereals, for example), fruitarians may need to include a B12 supplement in their diet or risk vitamin B12 deficiency.

 

Vitamin B12 deficiency exists across all diets and also exists in farm animals.  People who become b12 deficient are not recommended to eat more animal products but to supplement with b12.  In general, vegans are recommended to take b12 as their levels are lower on average that the majority of the population.  However many fruitarians do not supplement with b12 or any vitamin.

 

Growth and development issues

In children, growth and development may be at risk. Some nutritionists state that children should not follow a fruitarian diet. Nutritional problems include severe protein–energy malnutritionanemia and deficiencies including proteins, iron, calcium, essential fatty acids, raw fibre and a wide range of vitamins and minerals.[23]

 

The source for this is a book that I don’t have access to reading right now.  It is hard to know where the evidence for any of these assertions comes from. 

One thing we know is that when people say “protein deficiency” it is not clear what they mean as this is not a known medical condition.  Usually protein deficiency actually means a deficiency in calories, leading the body to consume it’s own protein to survive.

Studies on fruitarian children suffering from any of these deficiencies do not exist to my knowledge.

 

Notable adherents

Some notable advocates of fruitarianism, or of diets which may be considered fruitarian, or of lifestyles including such a diet, are:

 

August Englerhardt actually tried to live on Coconuts.  He is not a well known name in the Fruitarian world.

Arnold Ehret is for many seen as a pioneer of the fruitarian movement.

Raymond Bernard and Hereward Carrington wrote about the diet but are once again not particularly well known in Fruitarian circles.

Essie Honiball is a fairly well known pioneer of Fruitarianism.

Ashton Kutcher went on a short term fruitarian diet in preparation for this film.  It seems like he did not seek any advice on how to perform this.  This is unusual as his wife at the time, Demi Moore, is well known to have experimented with a high raw vegan diet and to have worked with Dr Doug Graham, one of the experts on a fruit based raw vegan diet. There is absolutely no connection between eating fruit and pancreatic cancer.

 

Ross Horne[31] and Viktoras Kulvinskas[32] appeared to only describe the fruitarian diet.[33] Johnny Lovewisdom experimented with different diets, including juicy fruitarianism,[34] liquidarianism (juices only),[35] vitarianism (fruit, vegetables, raw dairy)[36] and breatharianism.[37]

 

An unusual set of writers to reference, none of which particularly lived on a fruitarian diet long term.

 

Author Morris Krok, who earlier in his life lived “only on fruits”,[38] allegedly advised against a diet of “only fruit”,[39] although it was subsequently reported that Krok’s diet consisted of “just fruit”,[40] with dietary practices of fruitarians as varied as definitions of the term “fruitarianism”. Diet author Joe Alexander lived for 56 days on juicy fruits.[41]

 

It is unclear as to what Morris Krok ate and whether he was raw vegan or fruitarian for very long.  Many people like Joe Alexander have done experiments with just eating juicy fruits for similar periods of time.

This section is missing many well known adherents within the movement such as Anne Osborne. Others that could be said to be in the ball park of fruitarian could be Michael Arnstein, Ted Carr, Dr Doug Graham, Kristina Carillo Bucaram, Freelea The Banana Girl and others not mentioned here despite being much better known to the Fruitarian community worldwide.

 

Historical figures

 

This list is absolutely ridiculous.

 

 

Seriously, this is the first historical figure mentioned?  Violent, blood thirsty dictator Idi Amin!

 

  • Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, better known as Indian political and spiritual leader Mahatma Gandhi, sustained a fruitarian diet for 5 years.[43] He apparently discontinued the diet and went back to vegetarianismdue to pleurisy, a pre-existing condition, after pressure from Dr. Jivraj Mehta.[44][45]
  •  

 

Gandhi had read the works of Herbert Shelton and experimented with fasting also.  Doctors often advocate against certain diets despite the fact that they often have no qualification or education in nutrition.

 

 

I know very little about this man and have NEVER heard him mentioned in any books on Fruitarianism or by anyone in the fruitarian movement.  This seems to be a very obscure reference and almost seems like the author of the article wants to connect the fruitarian diet with crazy people.

 

  • Steve Jobs, who named his company “Apple” because he was experimenting with a fruitarian diet.[48]

 

Probably one of the best known. Did not follow a fruitarian diet long term but was a long term vegan. In his last days doctors tried to convince him to consume meat despite the fact that this practise has no scientific connection with helping to fight cancer.

 

Other historical figures missed out could be Adam and Eve (more allegorical but worth mentioning).  Some claim Pythagoras was a raw vegan and some also say St Francis Of Assisi was also raw vegan.

What we can find is evidence suggesting that our ancestors were fruitarian due to studies on the teeth of discovered fossils and skeletons.

 

Conclusion

 

This article clearly needs to be changed.  The sources are weak and it is written in such a way as to show the fruitarian diet in a bad light.  Well known adherents of the diet are missed out completely along with scientific information pointing to positive aspects of the fruitarian diet.

Are you willing to help change this article?  Feel free to contact us with your suggestions: info@fruitfest.co.uk

 

 

 

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(VIDEO) Detox Truth With Dr Doug Graham

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(VIDEO) Detox Truth With Dr Doug Graham

 

 

In the raw food community, a lot of misinformation has been spread over the years.  One of the main people that has worked to clear up some of these misguided ideas is Dr Doug Graham.

We often hear people talk about “detoxing” about “cleansing” about getting rid of the toxins and junk inside them.  In this video, Dr Graham points out that we can never rid ourselves fully of toxaemia.  But if our level of toxaemia is below the toleration level then symptons will not arise.

Feel free to share a comment on the video and share it with others.  You can find more about Dr Doug Graham at foodnsport.com or you search for the articles and videos with him on this site.

 

 

 

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Eat More Fruit! Video With Dr Doug Graham

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Raw Vegan Ultra Marathon Runner Harriet Kjaer Breaks Personal Best By 11 hours

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Raw vegan superwoman and ultra marathon runner Harriet Kjaer has just broken her personal best in the Andorra Ultramarathon Race.

Her time went from a personal best of 56 hours 18 minutes to 44 hours 30minutes

Harriet says: “Same route, same weather, same diet. Better training, better mental state but most importantly 7 years raw and starting to see amazing results.” Her coach, Dr Doug Graham, says “when someone goes raw, the real difference is seen 7-10 years later”

Can your sports performance be improved on a raw vegan diet?  There is no doubt that raw vegans have seen dramatic improvements in their performances.  One of the biggest benefits is a quicker recovery time allow athletes to train more.

At the same time, many athletes are held back by digestive problems and other niggles, aches and pains that are a result of a poor diet.  The raw vegan diet can truly help you unleash your athletic potential.

You can meet, and run with, Harriet at this years UK Fruitfest:

 

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Meet Michael Porter Jr., self-proclaimed ‘best player in the draft’ and raw vegan

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Meet Michael Porter Jr., self-proclaimed ‘best player in the draft’ and raw vegan

 

It is official!

Dr Doug Graham, a 4 time speaker at Fruitfest, is working closely with top NBA draft prospect Michael Porter Jr.

Reports suggest that Porter is heading towards a raw vegan diet.  Dr Graham has helped other high level athletes, including an NBA player, with improving their performance through a raw vegan diet.

In his book, the 80/10/10 Diet, Dr Graham came up with a plan that works not only for athletes but anyone wishing to pursue greater health with a raw vegan diet.

A recent article it states:

“Last fall, the Kansas City Star published a story about the Porter family’s diet and how it has changed since the family brought in a “performance consultant”. Lisa Porter, especially, saw the importance of diet in helping her sons Michael and Jontay (also a freshman at Mizzou who is entering the draft) maximize their physical abilities as they prepared to play basketball in college and the NBA. As the matriarch of the Porter family, Lisa brought in Doug Graham, a doctor of chiropractic medicine from outside of London, to coach her and the rest of the ten-person household on proper nutrition.

Graham had been advising the family on their diet for some time but last year he spent several days as a live-in chef and nutritionist, teaching lessons in the kitchen around the benefits of consuming a raw vegan diet.

According to Graham, “cooking food can produce ‘detriments’ to the body, anti-nutrients that increase the need for specific minerals, vitamins and antioxidants”. Recipes that Graham taught the Porters included vegan pizza with a zucchini crust, raw cinnamon buns, kale chips, and cashew-based cheese sauces to use in Mexican dishes.”

You can read the whole thing HERE

It will be interesting to see how this plays out.  If Michael lives up to his potential he could become one of the biggest stars in the NBA.  This could make him one of the best-known athletes in the world.  If the raw vegan diet is proved to help his performances stand out perhaps more athletes will move to experimenting with a raw vegan diet for their health.

At the UK Fruitfest this year, Dr Graham will be revealing some of his strategies that have helped him coach others to high- level performance.  This will take place on our special extra day mastermind programme.

We hope to see you there!

 

 

 

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Review: Lecture and Seminar With Dr Doug Graham and the Dublin Vegan group

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Review: Lecture and Seminar With Dr Doug Graham and the Dublin Vegan group

Last year, we had a number of attendees from Ireland at UK Fruitfest.  Greg Xavier was not only at Fruitfest but also ended up at Woodstock Fruit Festival.

A while later he mentioned that he had given a talk to the Dublin Vegan Group that he helped to run.  They were often having as many as 100 people turn up at their talks.

We arranged to put on something special in collaboration.

I spoke to Dr Doug Graham about it and almost miraculously he had a gap in his schedule for that weekend.  A few days later he was heading to Chicago to work for 3 weeks with a top NBA prospect.

Greg picked us up in Dublin and we headed to the lecture theatre. It was the Jonathan Swift lecture theatre at Trinity College Dublin.  This was a prestigious venue indeed.  Founded in 1592, Trinity College is not only the oldest surviving college in Ireland is also seen as the most prestigious.  It is seen as one of the 7 ancient universities of Britain and Ireland and one of the most elite institutions in Europe.

As you can see in the picture it was a room designed perfectly for a lecture and no microphones where necessary.

In advance, Doug told me he was going to do his “psychic act”.

I won’t tell you exactly what that turned out to be, in case you see him do it in the future, but it was an interesting way to put a presentation together.

He spoke for over an hour and the audience was wrapped in attention.  He was running and jumping around all over the rooms, taking questions left, right and centre and taking people out of the audience for demonstrations.

At the end, as we were leaving the attendees were hungry for more information and kept asking questions.

Many were excited for the seminar the next day and some were looking forward to the fruit festival.

That night, we got back to the flat and Doug started answering emails.  I went out to try to find some fruit and eventually had to take 2 taxis to a 24 hour Spar.  The fruit I found wasn’t great but we hadn’t eaten anything since 12pm.

As I walked around that night I felt inspired and elated.  It felt really great to have shared this message with so many people and made me feel like I was living in line with my purpose.  Dublin is a spectacular city.  We were right by the river where brand new state of the art buildings stand tall beside the river’s edge.

The seminar the next day….

….was mostly Doug teaching, but I had to work on Fruit festival stuff so I did not have too much time to participate.  Doug did a brilliant food demo that really wowed the audience.

Later that night, we were hosted by the owner of Cornucopia, Ireland’s oldest vegan restaurant.  The manager, Deirdra, was an incredible person.  Very funny and young at heart.  She was full of enthusiasm about what she was doing and that was infectious.

She told us her story of leaving Dublin as a student radical to go and live in Boston where she eventually ended up working at the Hippocrates health institute with Anne Wigmore.

 

She had eventually come back to Ireland to start this new restaurant with her partner who unfortunately died of cancer.  She has since built it into a very successful restaurant which was absolutely packed and had a queue out of the door the whole time we were there.

We left early the next morning and were sorry to leave.  The trip had been a success in my eyes and made me yearn for more travel and adventure sharing the message of fruit and health.

Who knows where we will end up next.

Stay fruity,

Ronnie

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