Blog

What We Can Learn From The Menu Of A Cinncinnati Raw Food Gathering in 1921

A Menu From The Gathering of A Raw Food Society From 1921 in Cinncinati

You may have thought that the raw food movement is a fairly new thing.  The truth is that raw food groups have been around since at least the start of the 20th century.  Here is a great example:

A menu from a gathering of a raw food group in 1921 has been unearthed which tells us some interesting things about what people were eating on their raw food diet back then.  Here is a picture of the menu:

 

As you can see, the group was called the Apyrtropher Society.  I found this description of the group:

“The Apyrtropher Society was a Chicago-based group of the early twentieth century, founded by George J. Drews, for the promotion of “unfired foods and hygienic dietetics” as the best means of preserving health and the attacking of allopathic medicine and any consumption of meat, alcohol, salt, processed sugar, and other unnaturalness in the human diet. Among their efforts to service the public good was a sanitarium, Health Haven, which employed Dr. J. W. Wigelsworth, D.N., of Pathometric and Anabolic fame, as lead diagnostician, offering all the latest in radiational and biodynamo-chromatic analysis.”

Looking at the menu in more detail we see some interesting things.

  • Firstly, the soup is a bit of an unusual recipe that I have never tried.  Tomatoes, cucumbers, beets and lemon juice.  I am not a fan of beet root so I will not be trying this soon. 
  • Secondly we move on to the “Aesthetic Synede”.  I am not sure what this means and can not find a definition for the word “synede” please feel fee to let me know.  However this is a very unusual combination.  Lettuce, carrots, tomatoes, bananas, almonds and honey.  If this is a kind of salad it is certainly an unusual recipe.  if you are willing to try it, let us know how it went!
  • Thirdly, we move on to a Bromade.  Once again, I can not find a suitable definition for this.  Any clue would be good.  The ingredients are: raisins, almonds and wholewheat flour.  It is unusual to see flour used in raw food recipes today as it is generally not considered part of the raw diet.  Potentially this tasted quite good, though I am not sure how palatable raw flour is.
  • Fourthly, we have a Relish of Bananas, Cranberries and Honey.  This is the second time they have used honey and they were clearly not vegan in the same way that people are today.  Once again, an unusual combination of a sweet fruit, Bananas, with an acid fruit, Cranberries.
  • Fifthly, Grape Drink, a mixture of Grapes, honey and water.  Essentially this would taste like a sweet grape juice, probably quite delicious.  Perhaps the grapes they had back then were not as sweet?  Grapes on their own can make a sweet juice with out the need to add any sweetener.
  • Lastly, we have the Unfired Pie.  “Unfired Foods” was a common term for raw food back then.  The pie contains:

        Crust – raisins and flaked almonds, Filling – bananas, apples, almonds and coconuts.

This would probably be a delicious recipe if made today.  It may be a little high in fat for some people but it would be a delicious one off treat.

Lessons Learned

We can learn a few things from this menu

  1. The concept of a mostly vegan, raw food diet was around as far back as the 1920s and there were enough people interested to host events at the Hotel Gibson (one of Cinncinnati’s best hotels at the time)
  2. They did not come across the concept of eating mono meals but instead ate unusual mixtures of foods.
  3. They did not eat meat or dairy but they did consume honey and therefore were not strictly vegan in terms of today’s definition of the word.  
  4. They used dried fruits, nuts and whole wheat flour in some of their recipes
  5. They did not have a meal called a “salad”, unless that is what one of the unusual names means.

 

It is wonderful to try to make a connection through time with these old societies and communities of raw food eaters.  Imagine what it would have been like to be there.  Would they have been asking the same questions and having the same problems as people have today with this lifestyle?

Back then of course there would have been less processed food and fast food.  The diet of that time would have been even lower in meat and dairy than it is today.  Perhaps more people were open to the idea than now?

If you have any more information on this group or any other old raw food group feel free to get in touch.

As ever, we would appreciate if you share this post with others.

Looking to learn more about the raw food scene now?  Why not come along to UK Fruitfest.  You can learn more about the event at our registration page.  http://www.fruitfest.co.uk/registration

 

 

 

RESPONSE to article “Eating Only Fruit Might Be Trendy, But It’s A Really Bad Idea”

RESPONSE to article “Eating Only Fruit Might Be Trendy, But It’s A Really Bad Idea”

 

A recent article posted on refinery29.com has put together 3 major reasons as to why a Fruitarian diet is a bad idea.  You can read the whole article here:

https://www.refinery29.com/en-us/frutitarian-fruit-only-diet-dangers

Let’s have a look through the article to confront the issues it raises and see if we can offer any helpful commentary on this.

The first problem with the fruitarian diet is:

 

Reason 1: “You need other nutrients”

 

This section, though recognising the many benefits of fruit, makes the claim that “fruit can’t provide all of the vital nutrients your body needs to function.”

This is true.  But this is true of all foods and all variations of diet.  The reason for this is that there are nutrients that we require that are not provided by food.  Vitamin D comes from sunlight on our skin and vitamin B12 is created by bacteria.  Other essential nutrients are created by our body once we have consumed the building blocks from food.

Therefore it is truthful to say that fruit doesn’t provide all of our required nutrients….but this is not giving the whole story.  The author then goes on to say:

“For example, you need foods with protein to transport, build, and repair tissue, and fat to protect your organs and help your brain do its job.”

This comment implies that fruit does not contain protein.  Although this is technically true, protein is not a required nutrient either as the body synthesises protein from amino acids.  All whole foods, including fruit contain amino acids.  The real question is whether there is enough amino acids in fruits to fuel our repair and growth?

Fruit contains roughly the same proportion of protein as does mother’s milk.  Mother’s milk is the food we consume when we do the most growth in our life, doubling our body size in a short space of time.  If nature has provided us with adequate protein in milk, then the amount of protein in fruit should also be adequate.

This is hard to disprove as cases of protein deficiency have never been found.  Conditions which are confused with protein deficiency such as kwashiorkor only occur in situations in which there is inadequate total calorie intake.  In other words, the person is actually consuming their own protein (and turning it into calories) due to a lack of food rather than because of a lack of protein.

No study has proven that a fruitarian diet is inadequate for protein in humans.  Our best way to evaluate this would be to look at other similar animals that consume a fruitarian style diet.  What we find is that these animals do not suffer from protein deficiencies despite their diet’s being almost entirely made up of fruit.

 

Reason 2: It’s restrictive.

 

In this section the author talks about the issue of restrictive eating.  Restricting what we eat is difficult to do long term and can lead to harming our relationship with food.

Although there could be some truth to these things the consequences of not restricting our diet in some ways are very severe.  We now know that people are much more at risk from eating to excess than eating restrictively.  The number of people suffering from problems related to unrestricted eating is far greater than those suffering from restrictive eating disorders.

Therefore, it makes sense that we should to some degree restrict our diets.  The alternative is to eat the standard diet that we know for sure contributes to the major diseases like heart disease, cancer and diabetes.

Though a fruitarian diet is difficult, it is made more difficult by the fact that we condition people to eat a poor diet from birth.  If people were brought up in a different environment with a different diet, then no one would have an issue sticking to that diet as it would be second nature to them.

The issue to stick to is whether a fruitarian style diet is healthier.  Though there is little research on people trying fruitarian diets in the long term this is something that will hopefully be studied more in the future.  For now we can look once again to animals that share our biology, who all seem to thrive on a fruit based diet.

Also, is eating fruit truly restrictive?

How many varieties of food does the average person consume per week?  Grains and grain based products, types of meat, dairy based products…it’s not a huge variety?  A fruit lover can eat hundreds of completely different types of fruit each year. As the seasons change, entirely new fruits appear for us to enjoy.

 

Reason 3: It could be pretty bad for you.

 

In order to back up this claim, the author has relied on an anecdotal story of Ashton Kutcher’s attempt at eating an all fruit diet to prepare for his role as Steve Jobs:

“he attempted to eat Jobs’ infamous all-fruit diet to get into character, and ended up in the hospital due to low pancreas levels.”

There is no explanation here as to what “low pancreas levels” means.  When someone goes to hospital, is it usual for doctors to test for “pancreas levels”?  Perhaps they are referring to insulin levels but we do not really know.

This is a pretty poor source to quote from.  Once again, there are no studies showing a connection between fruit and an impairment to the function of the pancreas.  There are none showing a connection between fruit and pancreatic cancer (which Steve Jobs died from).

What is also unusual is that Kutcher’s former partner, Demi Moore, has been famously said to be essentially a raw vegan:

https://www.celebrityhealthfitness.com/27289/demi-moore-wows-at-51-anti-aging-fitness-secrets-are-raw-vegan-diet-and-yoga-workouts/

She is known to have worked with Dr Doug Graham, author of the 80/10/10 Diet and one of the main people responsible for the rise in popularity of a fruit based diet.  It is unusual that he would not have turned to her for some advice on how to try this diet out.

“Additionally, for people with diabetes who can’t create or utilize insulin, an all-fruit diet could be harmful, according to the Cleveland Clinic.”

Any diet is harmful for a diabetic if they are not taking insulin.  Therefore once again, this statement is a half truth.  But is a fruit diet going to be more harmful for a diabetic. 

What has often been found, though not yet fully studied, is that people on a fruit based diet actually require less insulin if they are diabetic.  A great example of this is Robby Barbaro from “Mastering Diabetes”.  Robby has been on a fruitarian style diet for over 10 years and has had no problems with controlling his diabetes on this lifestyle.

 

Conclusion

 

“So, if you’re still intrigued by what an all-fruit diet entails, ask your doctor — chances are they’ll tell you to stick to “an apple a day,” and a variety of other foods as well.”

Of course this is really what everyone wants to hear.  Just keep eating whatever you are eating…move along, nothing to see here.

Doctor’s are not qualified to give nutrition or dietary advice.  The diet advice out there in the world of healthcare is pretty poor and often not in line with the latest science on nutrition.

Much of it has been influenced over many years by the agenda and lobbying power of various food industries.  This information has led to mass confusion in the public consciousness about diet.

We would encourage you to give a fruit based diet a try.  Don’t jump in over night but set it as your destination and start to move towards it by making gradual changes.  Many people start with fruit for breakfast, then they continue from there.

You may be amazed by the health improvements it brings as well as the change to your body, mind and spirit.  If you want to learn more about this kind of lifestyle consider coming to UK Fruitfest taking place from the 21st to the 28th of July, 2019.

 

FullyRaw Kristina’s Top 3 Salad Dressings

FullyRaw Kristina’s Top 3 Salad Dressings

 

Are you looking for some raw vegan recipe inspiration?

Looking for some new salad dressings?

In this video, shot at UK Fruitfest 2018, Kristina talks about her 3 favourite raw vegan salad dressings.

She know’s a thing or two about raw vegan recipes!

Watch more below:

 

 

Does A Raw Vegan Diet Cure Cancer?

Does A Raw Vegan Diet Cure Cancer?

 

Many people enthusiastically spread around the idea that a raw vegan diet and fasting can cure anything.

Can we really say this?

Can we be so confident to pass these ideas on to others?

We should be very cautious when we are providing people with any advice about their diet and health.  In some situations fasting and a raw vegan diet will not be the only answer.

To give people false hope is a sad thing.  Some people are so ill that they are beyond the point of recovery and all that can be done is to provide comfort for that person.  A raw vegan diet should help with that but does not guarantee recovery.

Please be cautious with your recommendations.  It scares me how many people I have met that think they can cure cancer with dandelion juice, cannabis oil, dry fasting and so many other things.  They really have no idea.

We can safely say that a diet high in fruits and vegetables can help to reduce your risk of getting cancer.  But once someone has cancer we have no certainty of knowing that it will help reverse it.

In this video, I discuss more about this: